Gig Review: Skinny Lister, 3rd May, Nottingham & 4th May, Cambridge, 2017 @SkinnyLister

Skinny Lister – Devil Heart Fight Tour with Support from AJJ band

Rescue Rooms – Nottingham 03-05-17 and The Junction – Cambridge 04-05-17

Written by Martin Tillyer, Photos by Martin Tillyer, Edited by Fi Stimpson.

The first time I saw and heard Skinny Lister was as support for Frank Turner along with Will Varley in November 2015 at Rock City – these artists are all on the Xtra Mile Recordings label.

Since that date, I have also had the pleasure of seeing them headlining on the first part of the Devil Heart Fight tour in 2016 and then as support for the Dropkick Murphys in London in January 2017.

As soon as the dates for this year’s UK tour were announced I ordered tickets for both of the shows being reviewed here, from this you can gather that yes I do like their music and I also had an idea what to expect from them.

The support – The AJJ Band from America – were new to me, having only seen one video clip on YouTube. “Goodbye, Oh Goodbye” comes over as a very quirky American pop type track. I have to say that having now seen them live they are so much more than that.

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The Rescue Room gig was sold out and the room was nearly full for the AJJ set, some of crowd had obviously seen them before and knew what their shows were like.

As they came out it was obvious that there was kit sharing going on as the drummer was using Skinny Lister’s kit. I think that this was a good thing as they are then not forced to be cramped up onto a stage and left with no room to move and also allows for a quicker change over between bands, some of the more well-known bands should perhaps take note of this.

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AJJ are touring as a four-piece band and start off with “Cody’s Theme”, the first track on their latest album “The Bible 2” which soon had the crowd moving around. They then played through a mixture of back catalogue and new songs that varied in pace, the slower numbers having the crowd listening to the thoughtful lyrics which showed the band’s observations on life. They are definitely a tight band and have the audience hooked; the energy they show is highlighted near the end of the set with the singer doing forward rolls around the stage. Anyone that likes Will Varley and Beans on Toast would definitely enjoy this and I know I will go to see them on their next tour.

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The room fills up to capacity as we wait for Skinny Lister to come on with most having already seen them before; it was good to see people in the crowd that we had met previously at the Bodega gig last October, it feels like a big friendly party is about to start and it does with as they come onto stage to start off with “Wanted“ the first track off Devil Heart Fight, a real upbeat punchy number. They then proceed in the usual Skinny Lister party mode through tracks take from all of their Album releases with the majority of them from Devil Heart Fight (9), Down on Deptford Broadway (7) and Forge and Flagon (6).

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Mid set they fitted in a new song “Thing Like That” which still has the typical Skinny punch too it, could well get to be a crowd favourite once more people know the lyrics.

There is a variance in pace as they slow down for some very soulful vocals from Lorna on tracks like “Bonny Away” sounding reminiscent of Sandy Denny.

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Skinny Lister certainly entertain with a flagon of rum passed out among the audience (sad to say that the Flagon had disappeared at the end of the night).

Party George, Lorna and Max’s dad, was in the crowd and Lorna set off to see him going crowd surfing in a dress, she certainly is one very brave lady.

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Scott Milsom the double bass player is certainly fitting in well having replaced Michael Camino – although I will miss his crowd surfing with the double bass.

They ended up with a three-track encore “Beat it from the chest”, “Hamburg Drunk” and “Six whiskies”, a track that should be played at the end of the night in any pub (it is on the playlist in my local).

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It was interesting to go to The Junction 2 in Cambridge to see both bands the following night to see if they could party just as hard, this gig wasn’t sold out, this was possibly because of the band Alabama 3 playing in The Junction 1 next door.

Both bands produced sets that were of the same excellent quality as the night before with some variance in the setlist order. Skinny Lister had to resort to sending a bottle of rum into the audience due to the replacement flagon they had obtained needing to be cleaned out before it can be used.

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The Skinny Lister audience is growing and I think they will soon be having to tour in larger venues, take your chance to see them in these smaller more intimate ones whilst you still can.

Both bands are very approachable and always spend time talking to the audience after the show, helping out with the merchandise sales and signing CD covers

Skinny Lister are a really hard working band and will be appearing at various festivals over the summer and continuing the Devil Heart Fight tour into Europe later in the year.

They are definitely worth seeing live – go to see them if you get the chance.

http://www.skinnylister.com/

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Album Review: The Virginmarys – Divides (reviewed by Steve Rodriguez) @thevirginmarys

The Virginmarys – Divides – review written by Steve Rodriguez

1. Push the Pedal

2. For you my Love

3. Halo in her Silhouette

4. Free to do Whatever they Say

5. I Wanna Take You Home

6. Walk in my Shoes

7. Kill the Messenger

8. Into Dust

9. Moths to a Flame

10. Falling Down

11. Motherless Land

12. Living in my Peace

The Macclesfield trio’s second studio album to follow up 2013’s King Of Conflict. Divides was released 6th May 2016 on Cooking Vinyl.

The Virginmarys are: Ally Dickaty (lead vocals / guitar), Danny Dolan (drums / backing vocals), and newly recruited Ross (bass / backing vocals).

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It’s all too easy to pigeonhole bands into a particular genre and if you can’t find one then you make one up. Nu Metal, Punk Pop, Hardcore, Industrial . . . . etc. etc. For The Virginmarys, you could try and stick them in a category, or make one up, or just accept that they really do have a bit of everything going on and are very very good at doing it.

Push the Pedal kicks off this album and on the sound of the dirty bass intro you start to think it’s 1992 and Layne Staley is still alive, then, the drums and a vocal echo enters the fray and you’re in 1996 and listening to a new Oasis track. Precisely why this band can’t, and shouldn’t be, categorised. It’s a powerful guitar drum and bass driven track, but what would you expect from a 3 piece, and Ally gives it the rasping, powerful vocal treatment it deserves. In a very unsubtle way, it says play this album on 11 . . .

For you my Love follows where Push the Pedal left off but is more of an instant hit with an almost Flea/Frusciante intro and a Stipe vocal over the top. This quickly gives way to the more familiar vocal sound and again it’s a powerful riff driven track that keeps the album driving forward purposefully.

Halo in Her Silhouette is the most sing-a-long track so far and you just knew that chorus line was going to repeat in that tried and tested late 70’s punk style. Don’t be lead down a path of thinking this band are a 3 piece punk outfit pulling a 3 chord trick from their sleeve at every opportunity though, there’s a lot more going on here and it’s another affirmation that this band cover pretty much all musical bases.

More punk style sounds ensue on the next track, Free To Do Whatever They Say, with a snarling, spitting vocal and guitar fuelled intro that builds into a bridge and chorus with some perfectly placed repeated backing vocals. It’s a chant, a probable crowd pleaser and again has all the energy that the first 3 tracks set the bar for.

The energy doesn’t subside on I Wanna Take You Home, but things do slow down a little here and enables Walk In My Shoes to follow with it’s more sombre and deep feel. The piano comes to the fore much more prominently this time and compliments the almost haunting backing vocals perfectly.

Kill The Messenger keeps the keyboard but layers of distorted guitar and bass ride over the top and makes for a Pink Floyd-esque sound with it’s low chord changes ebbing and flowing through the chorus line of the song.

Although there’s a hell of a lot of energy in this album the band resist the obvious temptation to be more crude with their language and instead express their lyrics in a much more subtle and well crafted fashion. It’s a surprise then when Into Dust starts with the F word in the second line. This is not the recurring theme of the song however and it quickly develops into familiar expressive and well crafted lyrics.

Moths To A Flame is arguably the album’s standout track and sometimes it’s easy to forget this is a three piece band when you hear such a vast, complex sound all rolled into one song. It has emotion and expression in abundance and this carries throughout the whole track from the Kings Of Leon sounding intro to the Biffy Clyro-esque ending.

Sandwiched between Into Dust and Falling Down, Moths To A Flame would possibly sound completely out of place on any other album, but, as The Virginmarys have so many influences to draw from it’s no surprise that Falling Down starts with a vocal that’s everything Mick Jones in both its sound and delivery. More proof that not only the band have a range of sounds but Ally is equally adept at displaying his own vocal range to suit the songs, lines, syllables . . .

Motherless Land is a nostalgic trip back to the early 80’s and if John Cougar or Springsteen had written this one then we wouldn’t bat an eyelid, although neither do we here and instead get caught up in the story of the song, listening intently as it builds and builds to a crescendo, a well placed clean sounding guitar solo and a very fitting sudden ending.

If Moths To A Flame was arguably the album’s standout track then it would be fighting with Living In My Peace for the title, and it would be a closely run thing. The album’s closing track, draws on everything that’s gone before, energy, haunting backing vocals, a big vocal range, guitar driven melodies with pounding drum fills and beats and an emotive, expansive and atmospheric crescendo. It typically rises and rises then drops in that well fitting sudden ending to leave you thinking about what may have happened next.

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If you’re a fan of music, listen to this album because I really think there’s something here for everyone and you won’t be disappointed. The north west seems to give us a lot of very respectable bands and The Virginmarys although not the typical shoe-gazing, jangly-sounding 60’s influenced mods that we’ve become accustomed to seeing from this neck of the woods, they can undoubtedly claim to be part of the club if they wanted to, but then again they’re likely to be perfectly at home being slightly different, and not in any way pigeonholed . . .

* Photos are from Ally’s recent gig in Peterborough as part of The Virginmarys’ People Help the People tour in aid of local food banks. Photos taken by and copyright to Fi Stimpson.

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Album Review by @SteveRodz :Ebbot Lundberg and the Indigo Children – For the Ages to Come @WebbotEbbot

Ebbot Lundberg and the Indigo Children – For the Ages to Come

Words: Steve Rodriguez

Release Date: Friday 2nd December 16

Track listing:

  1. For the Ages to Come
  2. Backdrop People
  3. Beneath the Winding Waterway
  4. In Subliminal Clouds
  5. Drowning in a Wishing Well
  6. Don’t Blow Your Mind
  7. I See Forever
  8. Calling from Heaven
  9. Little Big Thing
  10. To Be continued

The former The Soundtrack of Our Lives (TSOOL) and Union Carbide frontman teams up with The Indigo Children and serves us up some 60s psych-pop / rock with a small dose of 70s prog. This is an album that takes you on a musical journey full of jangling guitars and lilting melodies, wakes you up half way, and then slowly calms you down again with the most perfect vocals and expertly crafted songs.

Ebbot Lundberg has been away a little while but this is now proof that he hasn’t disappeared and is still doing what he does best.

The 60s psychedelia comes to the fore instantly on the album’s opening and title track. For the Ages to Come is a Syd Barrett Pink Floydesque offering (Arnold Layne and See Emily Play immediately spring to mind here) and shows just how versatile Lundberg’s vocals can be. In fact, there is probably no coincidence that “Arnold Layne” has been a regular on his live set over the past couple of years and by all accounts has had a very raucous make-over, and just as raucous a reception.

Backdrop People and Beneath the Winding Waterway are next up and both are a familiar sound as more 60s psych and vocal harmony combine to great effect leading you into the calm and melodic In Subliminal Clouds – chock full of instrumental interludes where a new sound seems to join the party each time.

Drowning in a Wishing Well blends acoustic guitar and vocal harmonies and is nowhere near as dark as the title would suggest. In fact, quite the opposite thanks to the brass and upbeat drums on the chorus giving it a positive and meaningful stride onwards into the albums main body.

The tracks on For the Ages to Come are arguably only subtly, but adequately different, until now when Don’t Blow Your Mind shatters the calmness with a huge guitar driven 70s style rock riff and vocal and almost prog-rock soloing. This is the stand out track here and will satisfy those of you that like your music to have a more raucous nature.

I See Forever is a more experimental affair and almost haunting with its synth undertone and repeating of the song title lyrics, and it is every bit as encapsulating and moving as those before.

The musical journey then continues its calmness once more to its more recognisable state on Calling from Heaven and Little Big Thing where the 60s psych pop and vocal harmonies are here again in abundance.

Closing track To Be Continued begins with a plugged in, but not over-powering guitar melody that more accessible 60s influenced pop / indie artists Lee Mavers and James Skelly would have been proud of; and Ebbot’s vocals blend in seamlessly over the top catching your ear instantly. It rises to a crescendo of bass, guitar, piano and an almost marching drum beat.

For the Ages to Come is an album that creates an expansive and complex sound with perfectly matching vocals and production and makes you really want to listen. Fans of TSOOL would have undoubtedly been disappointed when they called it a day, but if this is the soundtrack of Ebbot Lundberg for the foreseeable future then I would guess it is a more than adequate trade-off.

Upcoming shows:

01/12 (DE) Bielefeld Forum

02/12 (DE) Hamburg, Molotow/Skybar – TICKETS HERE 

03/12 (NL) Nijmegen, Marleyn, Doornrossje – TICKETS HERE

04/12 (UK) London, Upstairs at the Garage – TICKETS HERE

Song Review by @RussellBarker12 : Úyanga Bold – Machiavelli @uyangaboldmusic

Úyanga Bold – Machiavelli

Words by Russell Barker

Machiavelli is a veritable swirling melting pot of many influences, sounds and rhythms. It’s the latest song from the multi-talented Mongolian performer Úyanga Bold. Not only does she sing on this, she wrote it and plays guitar, synth and the Turkish Cümbüş on it. That’s before we’ve even mentioned the co-producing and co-engineering credits.

It has the glacial presence of Curve, with Úyanga’s voice alternating between sassy and cutesy. Machiavelli is brimming with eighties influences, infused with her native Mongolian sounds.

The music is a different take on the old quiet, loud, quiet, by dropping in and out before gradually building back up to the explosive chorus. The chorus itself is reminiscent of the sensual style of Lady Gaga. Whether this could crossover into the mainstream remains to be seen, it is certainly catchy enough, but is also rather leftfield. Its pop music, but not as we know it. Something to make you groove, but also to make you think.

Gig Review: The Divine Comedy at The Junction, Cambridge, 20th October 2016 @divinecomedyhq @lisaoneillmusic @cambjunction

At 5pm on a dreary Thursday evening, I received a message telling me that I had been added to the guest list with a photo pass for The Divine Comedy that very evening. A few panicked moments of organising childcare ensued, and I was then on the road to Cambridge to photograph one of my favourite ever bands! My car was filled with a frisson of excitement for the next hour and 15 minutes.

On arrival, The Junction was already pretty full, and it was very apparent that every person there felt exactly as I did.

Support act Lisa O’Neill was the perfect opener to The Divine Comedy.

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With her far-fetched tales (including one where she ended up making Irish stew for Elvis Presley), and her voice that made me imagine she only consumes the most luxurious chocolate and nothing else, she impressed, captivated and tickled the fancy of her audience.

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She was utterly delightful, and nicely set the tone for what was to come.

Setlist:

The Galway Shawl

Nasty

Elvis, I Give You Irish Stew

Pothole in the Sky

Planets

Sparkle

The time soon arrived for Neil Hannon and his band of quirky men to grace the stage. Hannon’s droll wit was immediately evident, just as I had hoped.

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I have always listened to The Divine Comedy’s intricate, classy tunes with fondness. To witness them live was beyond what I could have expected. Their fresh, lively compositions speaking of romance, laced with comedy and regaling the history of 18th century Russia both entertain and charm the audience in equal measure.

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Hannon himself is the ever-present member of the band when others have come and gone. He is the design behind the output. He may be small of stature, but he is superhuman in personality. Without his intelligent, odd, gentlemanly, mischievous, sincere, kooky ways, there would be no such music in the world.

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That evening, I was enchanted, bedazzled and fascinated, and left wanting more… there is no better sign of a great gig than that!

Setlist:

Down in the Street Below

Assume the Perpendicular

Bad Ambassador

Bang Goes the Knighthood

The Complete Banker

Generation Sex

Our Mutual Friend

Alfie (Cilla Black cover)

The Certainty of Chance

Sweden

How Can You Leave Me on My Own

To the Rescue

Count Grassi’s Passage Over Piedmont

The Frog Princess

A Lady of a Certain Age

Catherine the Great

Funny Peculiar (with Lisa O’Neill)

At the Indie Disco

Something for the Weekend

Becoming More Like Alfie

I Like

National Express

Encore:

Absent Friends

Songs of Love

Tonight We Fly

Album Review: Soviet Films – “Cetacean”@sovietfilmsband #NewMusic #MusicIsEverything

It’s been over two years since Soviet Films released their debut album, “Victory Songs”. At last they’re back with their second album, “Cetacean” (definition: an aquatic, mainly marine mammal eg a whale or dolphin).

In the past couple of years or so, these guys seem to have been working on a stronger sound. They’ve also had a bit of a band re-shuffle, with Andy now on bass and Lee on guitar.

The album kicks off with a lovely, dynamic instrumental track, “The Flow” – it made me think they’d had a serious change of direction, until the next tune commenced…

“Kraken” brings the mix of brash, occasionally nu-metal style vocals and layered melody that is so reminiscent of the previous record. I’m listening on an afternoon overtaken by a particularly impressive thunderstorm, and it fits the mood perfectly.

Next up is “Barrow, AK”. This song provides a multitude of contrasting sounds which enthral the ears and vocal harmonies galore. I love this band’s penchant for what they describe as random time signatures – that’s not easy to pull off, but to me it sounds excellent.

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“Brace Position” is a bit more of a tough sell, but is guitar rich and has a tight sound. I like the little guitar nuances about half way through the track, but for me the rest of the album demonstrates more complexities which I think suit their sound more.

The penultimate song, “Loomings”, is one of those songs that pleasantly washes over the listener. It has a more mellow feel than the rest of the album, despite the heavier elements of the tune.

Instrumental track “The Ebb” completes the album beautifully and accurately showcases what Soviet Films are all about. It also leaves an impression that there is much more to come.

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With just the right levels of wandering into new territory and staying in a familiar place, I’m looking forward to hearing what they do during the next moves in their journey.

Soviet Films are:

Mud – Vocals/Guitar
Lee – Guitar/Vocals
Peter – Drums/Vocals
Andy – Bass

You can buy the album on Bandcamp or iTunes and follow the band’s goings on using Twitter and Facebook.

Album review: Lust for Youth – “Compassion”. @Lust4Youth #MusicIsEverything

Lust for Youth – Compassion

Scrupulously clean synths with those fashionable in the 80s thick, suppressed vocals – think Dave Gahan, Jaz Coleman, Bernard Sumner… if that’s your thing, then maybe, just maybe, Lust for Youth will be right up your street.

With their new album “Compassion”, they somehow manage to fuse ambient, post-punk and dance music whilst simultaneously veer between feelings of ecstasy and melancholy.

Easing us into the album, “Stardom” is an effortless listen reminiscent of a time when music was shocking in its unprecedented uniqueness. This band is undeniably influenced by the likes of New Order and M83, and there are definite nods to these celebrated masters of all things electronica.

“Sudden Ambitions” feels delicate and weightless, but on the other hand is brooding and profound lyrically. The vocal layers are beautifully put together, and are positioned carefully amongst buoyant yet ethereal melodies.

The bewitching “Better Looking Brother” resonates with my every day thoughts, and the wistful tones of “Display” is a veritable pillar of strength.

“Compassion” is a single shining star on the darkest of nights.

Album Review: Hats Off Gentlemen It’s Adequate – “When the Kill Code Fails” @itsadequate #MusicIsEverything

When I got an email that kicked off by saying “new Prog Rock and Electronica Artificial Intelligence themed album”, my initial reaction was something along the lines of “What on Earth is this?!”, before deciding I absolutely HAD to hear it! I listen to every song sent to me, but this was something that really intrigued me!

Malcolm Galloway photo by Emre Basala

“I Still Remember You” was the first song I’d ever heard by Hats Off Gentlemen It’s Adequate. What immediately struck me is how confident this band are in their delivery. Mixing ambient, prog rock, trance, classical and electronica is no mean feat, but here all of those genres are connected by a barely audible thread. It’s as if nature intended it to be this way all along.

I am all at once fascinated and compelled to hear more, so my ears journeyed on to the band’s upcoming album, “When the Kill Code Fails”, available now digitally, with a physical release planned for 2016.

From the catchy yet thought provoking title track; traversing through the perfectly sublime trio of “Broken Wave”, “Layers” and “Connections”; manoevering carefully around the sharp bend that is “Head in a Jar” and crashing headlong into “Link”, the first half of this album has me travelling along a road I never want to end.

Continuing into the remainder of the album, the next song, “Going Down”, is something I almost feel like I’ve heard before; it’s got that kind of nostalgic rock feel. The lyrics portray a frustrated soul who can’t get out of a vicious circle within life. I think we can all identify with that at certain points of our own lives.

When The Kill Code Fails cover

Occasionally, this album conjours up an image of what would be produced if Bright Eyes and Jean Michel Jarre got together in a studio, injected with some Jethro Tull (now wouldn’t that be something!) and punctuated by grunge style guitar playing. Not an unpleasant thought at all!

Proceeding via the afore-mentioned “I Still Remember You”; navigating the hopeful and beautiful message of “My Clockwork Heart”, complete with bluesy guitar; roving around with “Freerunning” – a very groovy instrumental with hints of Metal – for company; taking an emotional wander with the sounds of my favourite track from the album “Solace” coursing through my mind – I’m not ashamed to admit that I welled up when listening to this.

Coming onto the final part of the wonderful exploration that is “When the Kill Code Fails”, I feel myself going into orbit whilst listening to the electronica masterpiece that is “Glass Lithium”. Finally, I reach my destination – “Alive” (again, I dig those Blues guitars).

“When the Kill Code Fails” covers so much musical ground, and I’m seriously impressed. If I had anything critical to say at all, it would be minor things such as… I’d like to hear stronger vocals and heavier drums in places. However, I’m being REALLY picky by saying those things, and it’s very much down to my personal taste, so can’t be construed as a failure in any way, shape or form.

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It may sound trite, but I genuinely feel as if I have arrived somewhere new. As it says in the last song on the album… “I want more”!

If you feel the same, check out Hats Off Gentlemen It’s Adequate on their official website and reverbnation, and contact them via twitter and facebook. You can buy the digital album on cdbaby and amazon. Go on, take that trip. You won’t regret it.

Review: Holy Matrimony – Sequence of Secrets

Both Liverpool and Manchester are well known on the music scene for producing some of the most iconic, exciting and popular bands in UK music history. Whether you like them or not, much of the music around these days would never have existed had it not been for bands such as The Beatles, Joy Division, The Stone Roses, The Smiths, OMD and Echo and The Bunnymen paving the way.

Whenever I see those cities named as home towns on a band’s bio, I feel a certain amount of trepidation prior to playing the music – I feel a bit for any new bands or musicians from that area, as they have a lot to live up to!

Introducing Holy Matrimony, new to the music scene this year with an offering of “melodic, electronic pop music” and declaring the three musicians, Jonny, Roger and Jack, to be “elektro-pop muzak visionaries”.

PhotoI’ve been able to glean very little information about these guys, and so far they have only made two of their songs public, one of which is a cover of U2’s “Sunday Bloody Sunday”. Everyone knows how I feel about U2, but I actually quite like this cover as they’ve gone a bit off piste with it, veiling the lyrics with rather lovely guitar & electronic effects, inserted echoes and basically removed all the Bono-ness from the equation. Good effort, lads.

However, I’d prefer to talk about the one original song I’ve heard, entitled “Sequence of Secrets”. There are definite nods to some of the influences the band cites, particularly Depeche Mode and Passion Pit inasmuch as the music is primarily electronic, interspersed with muted and somewhat grunge-like guitars and buoyed by clean, eloquent vocals singing a rousing verse about a confusing yet protective love. The lyrics are beautifully poetic, which isn’t something I say lightly – the voice and the words can very much be make or break for me, and this song has succeeded in winning me over.

“I didn’t know the things I know now with you,
And if I did there’s nothing that I can do,
There are shadows, in the depths of our minds,
And twisting turning lies, oh what am I?
To put all this on you.”

I am looking forward to hearing what Holy Matrimony have got up their sleeves in the future, and will be keeping a close eye on their progress.

You can do the same by following them on Twitter, Facebook, Soundcloud and Bandcamp.

Dots Recommends: Terrorista, Lauren Strange and Big Lonely

You know those days when you feel like you’ve got excess energy to burn, but you also cannot be bothered to get out of bed? Be honest – we all have them. On days like that, I like to listen to loud, full of attitude, music to get me the hell out of bed and ready to do something to talk about.

Today was one of those days, so I scoured my emails and found three bands that have kindly sent music to me who absolutely nailed it on the energetic front. I thought I’d share them with you.

First up, here’s a two piece band who hail from Toronto, Canada called Terrorista. They’ve only got four songs up on Soundcloud and Bandcamp so far, but damn they are good, and in my humble opinion their natural yet quirky take on the post-punk style bodes well for the future. The music is fast, genuine and downright awesome to listen to. I love ‘em!

Terrorista

Terrorista on Twitter

Terrorista on Facebook

Next, I’d like to introduce you to another Canadian band, Big Lonely. Their EP, “Close Your Eyes, Keep Talking”, is available to listen to right now on Soundcloud. Rousing tunes, eloquent vocals and rhythmic guitar sounds, this is a band who are seemingly using a tried and tested formula. However, they’re putting their own stamp on it with some injections of character and humour – I like that a lot, and I really enjoy listening to music with personality! More, please!

Big Lonely

Big Lonely on Twitter

Big Lonely on Facebook

Lastly today, this gorgeous lady (yes, she is a stunner) is called Lauren Strange. With a mix of grungy style guitars, a soulful yet sweet voice, catchy hooks that would get any crowd singing along, interspersed with some ethereal and countryish moments which shouldn’t work but do, this girl has a bright future ahead of her, I think. Maybe it’s that Nashville magic! Go and listen for yourselves!

Lauren Strange

Lauren Strange on Twitter

Lauren Strange on Facebook

Thank you all for reading, and I hope you’ve heard something you like here today!